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Petrolicious Showcases 1964 Ferrari 250 LM

Read and see more about Remo Ferri's Ferrari 250 LM here on Petrolicious

In honor of Ferrari's upcoming 70th anniversary, Petrolicious releases a video about one of the most gorgeous and historically significant cars featured on their channel. For those who aren't old enough to remember, when this car was developed, Ferrari and famous racing driver Ron Fry took first place in races all throughout England without so much as a single accident. Its design and engineering showcased the speed and reliability of a Ferrari race car. From 1964 to 1965, this car helped cement Ferrari as an even greater force to be reckoned with. Their proudest victory was their first place finish at the 1965 24 hours of Le Mans event.

But that would also be their last. Because in 1966 the Ford GT, driven by Chris Amon and Bruce McLaren won the next 4 years of Le Mans, breaking Ferrari's 6 year winning streak. The Ferrari 250 LM is the last Ferrari to take first place overall in Le Mans, thus concluding the heritage for this 53 year old mid-engine racing car.

If you're wondering about the cost, you're looking at an 8 figure price tag. Ferrari built 32 250 LMs, each one tracked in passionate detail. Chassis 6105 (Pictured below) was driven by Ron Fry himself, and it was sold in a 2015 auction for a cool $17,600,000.

The Scaglietti designed coupe featured a 3.3-liter V-12 engine, aluminum block, 6 Weber 38 carburetors, and a 5-speed manual transmission. Output is 320 horsepower. Its suspension used SLA in the front and rear with coil springs, dampers, and anti-roll bars. This isn't a road car so it doesn't have side mirrors. Its interior consists of two seats with steering wheel, gated stick shift, gauges, controls, and pedals.

You might be able to see a 250 LM at the Ferrari 70th anniversary celebration in Manhattan, New York on October 7-8. If you're not in the area, we hope you enjoy the video and pictures.


Photos by Patrick Ernzen ©2015 Courtesy of RM Sotheby's